Empty Nest Syndrome: What Is It?

Posted by on Aug 18, 2016 in Default |

Do you remember that feeling of holding your pregnancy test and it was positive? Maybe you were early to mid-twenties and it’s your first baby. How about holding that baby for the first time? Watching them take their steps and teaching them how to walk and talk. And then maybe you did all that all over again two even three times so you had a little brood of your own. All of those children you taught to walk, talk and use a spoon grow up and become teenagers who are finding their own identities among the chaos of school, hobbies and home life. You guide them through this, guide them through exams and social pressures and deliver well-rounded 18 year old young adults into the world and off they go to university, post graduate schools, meet someone and start to build their own families. Sounds fast, doesn’t it?

That’s because it is. One moment you’re holding your first born child and the next you’re holding their first born and in the blink of an eye the house is empty. How loud is the house without clattering steps, arguing about possessions and the laughter round the dinner table? It can lead to depression in some adults and in some, breakdown of marriages. By the time you’ve diluted your life with children and school runs you and your husband/wife have to find yourselves again. Sometimes, especially if you haven’t been working, the children have been your whole life. And they can be again. Consider the number of children out there without loving parents or homes that they can feel safe it. Consider contacting agencies such as nextstepfostering.org and speaking to someone about becoming a foster carer.

Sometimes your home can feel rather large and empty and it doesn’t have to be. If you have the space and the patience then taking a very important step in the role of a child who has never had stability or known what parental love feels like is just amazing. Imagine allowing your doors and your heart to open to other children who haven’t been as fortunate as your own. There are children out there that never know what it feels like to have a stable roof; the same bed, three square meals a day. They just don’t know how to react when someone cares for them because everyone else who has cared for them has let them down in a huge way.

Nextstepfostering.org can tell you whether you’re the right person to become a foster carer and whether or not you have the right tools in your home to be able to guide another young person. Don’t forget, children in the system won’t have had the same treatment you would have given your own and this can lead to them being very guarded, frightened and quite simply, angry. You have to ensure you’re in a position to help them open up while they’re with you and allow them to feel their feelings.

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Empty Nest Syndrome: What Is It?

Posted by on Aug 15, 2016 in Default |

Do you remember that feeling of holding your pregnancy test and it was positive? Maybe you were early to mid-twenties and it’s your first baby. How about holding that baby for the first time? Watching them take their steps and teaching them how to walk and talk. And then maybe you did all that all over again two even three times so you had a little brood of your own. All of those children you taught to walk, talk and use a spoon grow up and become teenagers who are finding their own identities among the chaos of school, hobbies and home life. You guide them through this, guide them through exams and social pressures and deliver well-rounded 18 year old young adults into the world and off they go to university, post graduate schools, meet someone and start to build their own families. Sounds fast, doesn’t it?

That’s because it is. One moment you’re holding your first born child and the next you’re holding their first born and in the blink of an eye the house is empty. How loud is the house without clattering steps, arguing about possessions and the laughter round the dinner table? It can lead to depression in some adults and in some, breakdown of marriages. By the time you’ve diluted your life with children and school runs you and your husband/wife have to find yourselves again. Sometimes, especially if you haven’t been working, the children have been your whole life. And they can be again. Consider the number of children out there without loving parents or homes that they can feel safe it. Consider contacting agencies such as nextstepfostering.org and speaking to someone about becoming a foster carer.

Sometimes your home can feel rather large and empty and it doesn’t have to be. If you have the space and the patience then taking a very important step in the role of a child who has never had stability or known what parental love feels like is just amazing. Imagine allowing your doors and your heart to open to other children who haven’t been as fortunate as your own. There are children out there that never know what it feels like to have a stable roof; the same bed, three square meals a day. They just don’t know how to react when someone cares for them because everyone else who has cared for them has let them down in a huge way.

Nextstepfostering.org can tell you whether you’re the right person to become a foster carer and whether or not you have the right tools in your home to be able to guide another young person. Don’t forget, children in the system won’t have had the same treatment you would have given your own and this can lead to them being very guarded, frightened and quite simply, angry. You have to ensure you’re in a position to help them open up while they’re with you and allow them to feel their feelings.

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Types of Fostering

Posted by on Aug 15, 2016 in Default |

Fostering is a way of providing a safe place and a family life for children who otherwise have never experienced love and kindness or stability. It is often used to provide temporary care while parents get help sorting out their problems or to help children and young children through a difficult time in their lives. Often is the case that children return home to their families once their family situation has been effectively dealt with and taken care of and that way they’ve been somewhere warm and safe while those issues are ironed out. Others stay in long-term foster care, some are adopted out and some leave foster care straight into adulthood. Websites such as ryancarefostering.co.uk have tons of information on the types of fostering as well as how you can become a foster carer.

There are many fostering agencies in London that have unfortunately many children waiting to be fostered out or adopted. There are many different types of fostering and we have them listed here so that you can see how different fostering can be.

  • Emergency fostering: children who are emergency fostered are those who have been removed from an immediate danger and need somewhere to stay for a few nights. This can also include children who are removed from birth for whatever reason and need a warm place to go.
  • Short-term: children are short term fostered while plans are being made for their future. This can be for weeks or months at a time and are cared for as best as possible in a consistently stable environment. Companies such as ryancarefostering.co.uk look out for children in these situations as well.
  • Short-breaks: sometimes parents need a respite from their child/children especially if they have certain disabilities or behavioural issues and their parents and usual foster carers have a break. These stays are pre-planned and regular to allow for some breathing room for those handling special needs on a very regular basis.
  • Remand fostering: sometimes young children in England and Wales are ‘remanded’ to care while their fate is decided by the courts. Remand care is usually with a specially trained foster carer.
  • Long-term/permanent: not all children who cannot return to their own families want to be adopted, especially older children and those who have regular contact with close relatives. Just because their situation at home with their parents is undesirable it doesn’t mean they want to permanently have another family caring for them. Agencies such as ryancarefostering.co.uk can help you see whether you would be suitable for this type of fostering. These children tend to be older and stay in long term care until they can move out to take care of themselves.
  • Private fostering: this is where parents make an arrangement for the child to stay with someone else who is not a close relative and has no parental responsibility. The child stays with this person for no longer than 27 days. This is a private arrangement but the council still has to be told all about the arrangement.
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Sleep Training: A Guide

Posted by on Aug 15, 2016 in Default |

Sleep is one of the biggest sacrifices of parenthood. From the moment you become pregnant, your sleep becomes interrupted. Your trimester stages generally dictate how little sleep you get, and it becomes less as the pregnancy progresses. Once your new born baby has arrived you are then in a situation – if you are extremely unlucky – of being woken every 2-4 hours a night for an absolute minimum of six months. You could be very lucky and have a baby who sleeps right through the night save for a feed or two but for the normal baby, that doesn’t happen.

Sleep training is all about getting your little one to sleep and there are companies out there like hatacademy.co.uk that offer actual sleep training courses. What I will say though, is that you can read every book and take every course out there, but that doesn’t mean there is a magic cure. Our babies are born without instruction manuals and rule books and what works for one baby will not work at all for another baby. It’s important to remember that before you buy up every book store book on sleeping babies!

There are a few methods of sleep training and none are recommended to start before the baby is six months old. The reason for this is that a baby is actually supposed to wake up. Their stomachs are tiny for a start so regular feeding is the only way they will grow; they don’t stay full for as long as an adult does. When babies are born they have emerged from a warm, dark safe place in a small space to a world that is loud, bright, cold and absolutely huge. That is scary! It’s like being stuck inside with a broken leg for weeks and being allowed outside; you’re disoriented and may feel overwhelmed and seeing as babies can only communicate by crying, that is exactly what they do. All they want is to be held those first few months and the development that they go through during those months is huge.

At six months old, a baby has learned that you are there for comfort and they have also mostly learned that when you go away, you will come back. There are three very common sleep training methods: cry it out, controlled crying and pick up and put down. Crying it out is the least recommended and it’s the practice of putting a warm, full, dry baby down on its back in its room while sleepy to go to sleep. Once in the cot, if they cry, they cry and you don’t go in to see to them. The downside to this is that they learn that no one will come when they cry, so they learn to stop crying. Controlled crying starts in a similar way, but you go into the room every minute for the first night and gently sooth the baby without picking it up and gradually increase the timings until they understand sleeping without you is ok. The last is a combination of the two but each time you see the baby you pick up, calm it down and put down and repeat until they are asleep.

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